Explore Wetlands through Free Guided Walks
The Canada darner is among the largest dragonflies in this area. They are strong flyers and were spotted as they flew around the walk participants, catching smaller insects in flight.

The Canada darner is among the largest dragonflies in this area. They are strong flyers and were spotted as they flew around the walk participants, catching smaller insects in flight.

This year the Junction Creek Stewardship Committee is focusing on wetlands and their importance in urban systems.

Recently they invited the community to Rotary Park to participate in a wetland ramble to see dragonflies and butterflies up close. The park includes the area around Adanac Ski Hill. It also borders the Ponderosa Wetland, one of the largest wetlands in the city core.

Community members learned about dragonflies and butterflies at a wetland ramble on August 6th. Another ramble is scheduled for Aug 27 and will focus on birds and wetland plants.

Community members learned about dragonflies and butterflies at a wetland ramble on August 6th. Another ramble is scheduled for Aug 27 and will focus on birds and wetland plants.

The event was guided by local naturalist Randy Moratz. Many kinds of flying insects were spotted. From tiny eastern forktail damselflies to a great spangled fritillary butterfly. The information collected during the walk will help the stewardship committee better understand the Ponderosa Wetland.

Layla helps release a common whitetail dragonfly.

Layla helps release a common whitetail dragonfly.

If you missed the first walk, there are still more to come, each with a different theme. The next ramble will be Saturday August 27th at 10:00am. It will look at species of birds and plants in the wetland. Other topics are aquatic bugs (Sept 17) and winter track ID. These rambles are a great opportunity to explore and enjoy this beautiful space with your family.

These walks are free to attend. They are supported by partnerships with the RBC Blue Water Fund, Vale Canada Ltd., the City of Greater Sudbury, and the Nickel District Conservation Foundation.

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